If you’ve walked around London, you must have noticed the blue plaques on the facades of some buildings, scattered all around the British capital. There are 900 of them!

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Anything Blue Review – the Blue Plaques of London celebrates its 150 anniversary – English Heritage
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The blue plaques connect building with notable celebrities who used to live and work on the premises, from William Shakespeare to John Lennon.

A fun and original way to attract tourists and residents attention to cultural aspects of London, the scheme now run by English Heritage started in 1866 and has inspired many other cities around the world.

You can track the blue plaques down via a free iPhone app (also available on Android) and learn surprising facts – for instance, did you know that Jimi Hendrix lived in the same house as George Frideric Handel (on Brook Street, Mayfair), 245 years apart?

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Blue Plaques of London, English Heritage - Anything Blue

Politicians, authors, musicians, inventors, artists are celebrated via the Blue Plaques of London scheme

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The plaques became officially round in shape and blue in colour after the Second World War – but you can still come across some brown, bronze, square or rectangle ones. Since 1984, each blue plaque is handmade in Cornwall by the same artisan family, the Ashworth.

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Blue Plaques Stories
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How well do you know your English history? Take the Blue Plaques quiz here and find out (we got 7/10, so we won’t show off).

Blue Plaques of London, English Heritage - Anything Blue

Take the Blue Plaques of London Quiz on English Heritage website

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Not sure you’re ready yet? Rehearse with blue plaques stories and discover London through a particular theme: the Olympic Heroes, the LGBT movement or European Composers.

Our favourite theme? Follow James Joyce, Agatha Christie and Siegfried Sassoon in Kensington for a happy blue literary walk.


Source: The Blue Plaques of London on english-heritage.org.uk

The Blue Plaques of London App - Anything Blue

Sir John Everett Millais was a XIXth century painter. He lived and died on 2 Palace Gate, in London W8, in what is now the High Commission of Zambia – learn more with the Blue Plaques of London App – Anything Blue

How are these blue plaques made? Discover the Blue Plaques video about the making off of Freddie Mercury’s blue plaque.